March 3, 2015

Review: Catching Fire

Catching Fire (The Hunger Games, book 2) by Suzanne Collins

catching-fire-suzanne-collins

Genre: Young Adult Dystopian
Edition Reviewed: Hardcover
Amazon: Paperback | Kindle
Goodreads: Catching Fire (1)

Sparks are igniting.
Flames are spreading.
And the Capitol wants revenge.

Against all odds, Katniss has won the Hunger Games. She and fellow District 12 tribute Peeta Mellark are miraculously still alive. Katniss should be relieved, happy even. After all, she has returned to her family and her longtime friend, Gale. Yet nothing is the way Katniss wishes it to be. Gale holds her at an icy distance. Peeta has turned his back on her completely. And there are whispers of a rebellion against the Capitol - a rebellion that Katniss and Peeta may have helped create.

Much to her shock, Katniss has fueled an unrest she's afraid she cannot stop. And what scares her even more is that she's not entirely convinced she should try. As time draws near for Katniss and Peeta to visit the districts on the Capitol's cruel Victory Tour, the stakes are higher than ever. If they can't prove, without a shadow of a doubt, that they are lost in their love for each other, the consequences will be horrifying.

In Catching Fire, the second novel in the Hunger Games trilogy, Suzanne Collins continues the story of Katniss Everdeen, testing her more than ever before...and surprising readers at every turn.


Review:

Yeah, I am just reading this book. It's sad I bought the book back when it first released, but never got around to it. Shamingly I even watched the movie before reading the book. So it gives me great pleasure to say that Catching Fire was better than The Hunger Games. Heck, it was better than the Catching Fire movie! Normally I don't pick favorites and get on a soapbox. However, I had issues with the movie and Katniss. (That's not to say that I didn't enjoy the movie, I loved it!)

In the movie Katniss seems oblivious and well, stupid. She's still an amazing leading lady. But it's just hard to believe that she's not taking notice of some things . . . Well! In the book she is! She's seeing an uprising being born, and she is aware to some extent of what's going on. While I found at times her constant, “No that can't be true, this is what's really going on” attitude exceedingly annoying. Especially since her self forced “obliviousness” causes her to be a real bad judge of people. And it's interesting to see how everyone is trying to manipulate her, only seeing her as a figure head of an idea. Personally I think it goes back straight to the first book when her “friend” gives her that Mokingjay pin. Cudos to all those people for deciding Katniss was strong enough to carry out—and actually be successful in the games—with the message. It doesn't say much for Katniss.

In fact, I really like how Collins brings into consideration the type of people who are able to win the Hunger Games. Sure she brings into light that sometimes simple chance—you know the odds fall in your favor—win Victor’s the games. People who will do whatever it is to survive, calculating minds, sometimes cruel, and a certain type of ruthlessness will crown the Victor. However, that doesn't mean they're all psycho paths. It's that survival instinct. Which Katniss has plenty of, and what I love most is seeing it in play with her conscious. Katniss is a protector. Especially of the weaker and less fortunate.

What I like more is the love triangle in Catching Fire. I found both Gale and Peeta to be excellent love interests. They both have flashes of jealousy, but it's understandable and in the end their actions are about doing what's right. (And the jealousy is brief.) It does drive me crazy that Katniss's dilemma of how she “truly feels” is basically brought on by her not thinking about getting a boyfriend. Sure I like that she's decided that having someone to love and have a family with them will equal more pain, and a risk she does not want to take. Yet she's aware enough of Gale's feelings, feels like she's betraying him, and seems to only think she should have him because that's what everyone else has always thought. Honestly the only thing I see happening for poor Gale is the brother zone. Besides at this point Peeta has gotten more time and development for Katniss. It would feel hollow at this point in Gale gets the girl. Readers know Peeta more, and simply saying that Gale and Katniss have tons of history do not character development make. Nor do a few flashbacks.

Overall I do like that Katniss is flawed. Peeta is right, there is a certain “pure” quality to Katniss. Though I think of it more fondly as self preservation in the form of forced obliviousness. The love triangle is pretty good, and I like that while it's present it doesn't carry the entire story. Though it plays a big part. In the end it's equal parts action and romance to create a heady blend. Hopefully the next book will have more of the uprising and less of Katniss just being a figurehead yo-yo being manipulated by everyone. (I love how Peeta is always the damsel. Sure he does help Katniss, but how many times does he have to be saved? Come on you secretly love it. Role reversal!) This book was a rush and I loved every second of it. The Hunger Games are intense, add the political drama and it just sweetens the deal. Readers get to see more of the bigger picture here getting the dirt on old characters, and plenty of new ones to really expand the world of The Hunger Games! Catching Fire is a one heck of a follow-up! Just be ready with Mockingjay on hand because it's one heck of a cliffhanger.

Sexual Content: Kissing mild and mild making out. Some sexual humor, but it’s all pretty clean for a book about kids killing kids.

 
5/5- Fabulous, a beautiful obsession!


Previous book(s) in series:
Reviewed on BW: Amazon: Goodreads:
The Hunger Games (1) 
Catching Fire (2)
Mockingjay (3)
The Hunger Games (1)
Catching Fire (2)
Mockingjay (3)
The Hunger Games (1)
Catching Fire (2)
Mockingjay (3)

March 2, 2015

Cover Coveting(8)

 
Cover art is found from Wicked Scribes, ATUF, Goodreads, social networks, and other sources.
***All cover art may not be final.***


Chapelwood by Cherie Priest

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


chapelwood Series: The Borden Dispatches, book 2

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal-Historical-Horror

Shera’s thoughts:

So cool! This is the perfect cover to advertise why gender blending is at it’s best right now!

Like this cover, it’s awesome.

Daughter of Dusk by Livia Blackburne

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


daughter-of-dusk Series: Midnight Thief, book 2

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Young Adult

Shera’s thoughts:

This does not fit the series well. But I do really love this cover! What a cool way to make that paw print look awesome.

Evolution by Stephanie Diaz

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


evolution Series: Extraction, book 3

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Young Adult Sci-Fi (Young Adult Dystopian)

Shera’s thoughts:

OK. OK. So I talk about it all the time. Cover designs being uniform that in one glance you know it’s part of a series.

The Extraction series does it so well! Ah, I love each sci-fi awesome cover!

Ice Like Fire by Sara Raasch

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


ice-like-fire Series: Snow Like Ashes, book 2

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Shera’s thoughts:

N/A

Imprudence by Gail Carriger

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


imprudence Series: The Custard Protocol, book 2

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Steampunk

Shera’s thoughts:

Love it!

All I can say is how I hope the series doesn’t suddenly get those crappy Photoshop fan-created covers that Parasol Protectorate series.

Manners & Mutiny by Gail Carriger

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


mannaer&mutiny Series: Finishing School, book 4

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Young Adult Steampunk

Shera’s thoughts:

Carriger has to be one happy author because she’s getting some pretty awesome covers.

I really love the covers for the series. The stylish image of the black and white girls get me every time. Especially coupled with the Victorian wallpaper designs in such colorful hues.

Mind Magic by Eileen Wilks

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


mind-magic Series: World of the Lupi, book 12

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Urban Fantasy

Shera’s thoughts:

Yes-yes-yes-yes-yes!!! Man this series has gorgeous covers.

This one though. Oh, this one is epic.  Sweet perfection.

Mystic by Jason Denzel

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


mystic Series: The Mystic Trilogy, book 1

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Shera’s thoughts:

Classic gorgeous fantasy cover. Ah, memories.

February 27, 2015

Cover Coveting(10)

 
Cover art is found from Wicked Scribes, ATUF, Goodreads, social networks, and other sources.
***All cover art may not be final.***

Actually watched St Vincent tonight. (Tonight being Oscar Sunday!) The movie was excellent. In fact, I’m really sad that movies like that seem to get passed by so much. It had a great message and I urge movie fans to watch it.


Alien Separation by Gini Koch

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


alien-separation Series: Katherine “Kitty” Kat, book 11

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Science Fiction

Shera’s thoughts:

Gosh this series gets such amazing covers! Every time a new one comes out I smack myself in the head and wonder why I haven’t tried them yet!

Any who I love how she’s holding two guns and it isn’t some crazy ass pose!

Blood and Salt by Kim Liggett

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


blood-and-salt Series: N/A 

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Young Adult

Shera’s thoughts:

Wow. So creepy.

So simple. So creepy.

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon

city-of-bones


city-of-bones Series: The Mortal Instruments, book 1

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Young Adult

Shera’s thoughts:

This is a cover makeover. Honestly I don’t know why this series is apparently getting one. Now it looks like part of the Percy Jackson or independent reader grade.

It’s pretty to look at, but of all the series in need of a makeover this is not one of them.

Crow Moon by Anna McKerrow

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


crow-moon Series: N/A 

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Shera’s thoughts:

Oh, I just love it! The art style and silhouette of the cover. The typography and everything.

This is why I covet the covers!

Dark Metropolis by Jaclyn Dolamore

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon

dark-metropolis


dark-metropolis Series: Dark Metropolis, book 1

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Young Adult

Shera’s thoughts:

Honestly I’m not sure as to the reason behind  this cover makeover.

Glittering Shadows by Jaclyn Dolamore

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


glittering-shadows Series: Dark Metropolis, book 2

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Young Adult

Shera’s thoughts:

At least the covers match well.

Dark Skye by Kresley Cole

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon

dark-skye


dark-skye Series: Immortals After Dark, book 14

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: N/A

Shera’s thoughts:

Looks like the paperback release is getting a shiny new cover.

It’s pretty awesome. I like it a lot more than the hardcover.

But does it bother anyone else how inconsistent all of the covers are? They change willy-nilly, and now fans have to contend with paperback and hardback covers being different. *sighs*

Deceptions by Kelley Armstrong

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


deceptions Series: Cainsville, book 3

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Urban Fantasy

Shera’s thoughts:

Even for me this is a little too . . . weird. Wonder if this means the whole series will be getting a makeover. Personally I liked the style of the previous two books.

Even Vampires Get the Blues by Sandra Hill

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


even-vampires-get-the-blues Series: Deadly Angels, book 6

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Romance

Shera’s thoughts:

Fits the series well. Who knew angel wings and open suit could be so darn sexy. Purrrrr.

Though I will say that his angel wings look the fakest of the bunk.

Fearless by Marianne Curley

Previous book(s) in series:

Goodreads | Amazon


fearless Series: Avena, book 3

Add it: Goodreads | Amazon
Genre: Paranormal Young Adult

Shera’s thoughts:

This is a bit of a step up from book 2, but sadly the coolness of book 1 can not be reproduced.

February 26, 2015

Review: Soulless

Soulless (Parasol Protectorate, book 1) by Gail Carriger

soulless

Genre: Steampunk
Edition Reviewed: eBook
Amazon: Paperback | Kindle
Goodreads: Soulless (1)

Alexia Tarabotti is laboring under a great many social tribulations.

First, she has no soul. Second, she's a spinster whose father is both Italian and dead. Third, she was rudely attacked by a vampire, breaking all standards of social etiquette.

Where to go from there? From bad to worse apparently, for Alexia accidentally kills the vampire--and then the appalling Lord Maccon (loud, messy, gorgeous, and werewolf) is sent by Queen Victoria to investigate.

With unexpected vampires appearing and expected vampires disappearing, everyone seems to believe Alexia responsible. Can she figure out what is actually happening to London's high society? Will her soulless ability to negate supernatural powers prove useful or just plain embarrassing? Finally, who is the real enemy, and do they have treacle tart?


Review:

Gosh, I'm in love. Everything about Soulless hits all the good spots. While it's not over the top steampunk, it has enough flavor to spice up a world that is now aware of the supernatural and has taken different steps into the future from our known history. To me it makes perfect since the technology would take slightly more colorful steps. Not to mention that Alexia Tarabotti is an amazing lead. She may be a spinster due to her Italian blood and dead father, plan looks, too voluptuous—no it’s not actually called that in polite society—and smarts; she's a proper English lady. Well, as proper as she wants to be. She tells things how it is most of the time which may be shocking, but she's always polite about it. Come on how can you not love a book that has the utmost politeness while the lead is being strapped up for torture?

It might take readers a moment to fall into the swing of the British “accent” of the book, but it's like any good BBC show. Once you catch on the rest is magic! For me one of my most favorite things about the British is their humor, made all the more awesome because of the historical time period of the book. While it could get annoying that the amazing Alexia is a spinster and everyone—especially her family—keeps informing her about her undesirable qualities Carriger does a wonderful job bringing humor and just enough depth to make it understandable for the time period. (And personally makes me happy those days are gone for women. In the most part.)

Lord Maccon is Alexia’s rake. Come on he’s  a Alpha werewolf, high ranking, powerful, smart and on top of all that Scottish. Boom! What a combination. Not to mention when Alexia and Maccon are tossed together. They’re bickering flirting is cute and the mystery of the hedgehog warms my heart. With smiles. What I like more is that Maccon can’t understand why no one would want her. While reading this with a friend she stated that she didn’t understand why Maccon could see how amazing Alexia was, but Alexia despite all her brains agreed with everyone that she would be a spinster forever. But it was clear to me with society, her friends, and most importantly her family mentioning her faults constantly I’m amazed she turned out as awesome as she did. Even the most amazing characters have personal doubts, what’s true character strength is to eventually get past them. (And personally I did not think it was that big of a deal. Just over thinking. Yeah, I know me saying that.)

I did have a problem with The Queen telling Alexia that she had great investigation skills, when the plot/mystery just falls into her lap and everyone is simply pulled in. Really it's a bunch of dandies that deserve all the praise this time. However, I can forgive it this time around. Because the humor, sophistication, paranormal elements, and the historical romance-investigation feel of Soulless is perfect. Even if I still don't quite understand why Alexia is classified as soulless in the long run . . . and other obvious paranormal related questions are ignored. That's for another book.

Overall Soulless is pretty darn close to perfection. Don't let the British accent of the book intimidate you. It always saddens me when readers can't embrace other flavors of English. (Yes, I'm thinking of my beloved Kate Forsyth.) Soulless is the ultimate in genre blending with urban fantasy elements, mystery, historical romance, comedy, and tea. (Tea had to be mentioned at some point!) Alexia is a fantastic leading lady and Lord Maccon is one sizzling gentleman werewolf. The Parasol Protectorate is clearly going to be a wonderful addiction.

Sexual Content: Actually for be so proper. It’s got the goods. Wink. Plenty of sexual humor, some homosexual themes, and such.

 
5/5- Fabulous, a beautiful obsession!


Previous book(s) in series:
Reviewed on BW: Amazon: Goodreads:
Soulless (1)
Changeless (2)
Blameless (3)
Heartless (4)
Timeless (5)
Soulless (1)
Changeless (2)
Blameless (3)
Heartless (4)
Timeless (5)
Soulless (1)
Changeless (2)
Blameless (3)
Heartless (4)
Timeless (5)

February 25, 2015

Wednesday Wishes

Wow, I had to debate for almost two days what book to read next!! How strange a feeling. It wasn’t for lack of a books. It was too many, I kept debating what one I should read next.


The Light Who Shines by Lilo Abernathy

The Light Who ShinesGet it: Amazon | Goodreads
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Series: Bluebell Kildare, book 1

When Paranormal Investigation Bureau agent Bluebell Kildare (a.k.a. Blue) arrives at the scene of the crime it is obvious the grotesquely damaged body of the deceased teenage boy was caused by far more than a simple hit and run. Using her innate sixth sense, she locates a powerful magical artifact that acts as a key to an ancient Grimiore and is likely the motive for the crime. She soon discovers the Grimiore has a dark past as it was instrumental in the creation of the Vampire breed and still holds the power to unravel the boundaries between hell and earth.

Blue and her faithful wolf Varg follow the trail starting at the Cock and Bull Tap and all through the town of Crimson Hollow, which leads to plenty of dead ends; some more dead than others. Between being sidelined by a stalker that sticks to the shadows, and chasing a perpetrator that vanishes in thin air, things are getting complicated. Dark vampire activity is at an all time high and hate group activity is increasing. However, it's her burgeoning feelings for Jack Tanner, her magnetic Daylight Vampire boss, who alternates between warm affection and cool indifference that just might undo her.

While Blue searches for clues to nail the perpetrator, someone seems to be conducting a search of their own and things are getting extremely messy. Who will find whom first? Danger lurks in every corner and Blue needs all her focus in this increasingly dangerous game or she risks ending up the next victim.

The reviews are mixed, but this caught my eye. It sounds really fun and I’d like to give it a try. It’s no secret that I’ve been lamenting about UF series not coming out.

The Spinster Bride by Jane Goodger

the-spinster-brideGet it: Amazon | Goodreads
Genre: Historical Romance
Series: Lords and Ladies Series, book 1

Mr. Charles Norris needs help finding a wife…

For he has the unfortunate habit of falling for each Season's loveliest debutante, only to have his heart broken when she weds another. Surely Lady Marjorie Penwhistle can help him. She's sensible, clever, knows the ton, and must marry a peer, which he is not. Since she's decidedly out of his reach, Charles is free to enjoy her refreshing honesty—and her unexpectedly enticing kisses…

Lady Marjorie Penwhistle doesn't want a husband…

At least not the titled-but-unbearable suitors her mother is determined she wed. She'd rather stay unmarried and look after her eccentric brother. Still, advising Mr. Norris is a most exciting secret diversion. After all, how hard will it be to match-make someone so forthright, honorable, and downright handsome? It's not as if she's in danger of finding Charles all-too-irresistible herself…

Been seeing this series floating about, but this is the title that finally caught my eye.

Woven by Michael Jensen

wovenGet it: Amazon | Goodreads
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy
Series: N/A

Two unlikely allies must journey across a kingdom in the hopes of thwarting death itself.

All his life, Nels has wanted to be a knight of the kingdom of Avërand. Tall and strong, and with a knack for helping those in need, the people of his sleepy little village have even taken to calling him the Knight of Cobblestown.

But that was before Nels died, murdered outside his home by a mysterious figure.

Now the young hero has awoken as a ghost, invisible to all around him save one person—his only hope for understanding what happened to him—the kingdom’s heir, Princess Tyra. At first the spoiled royal wants nothing to do with Nels, but as the mystery of his death unravels, the two find themselves linked by a secret, and an enemy who could be hiding behind any face.

Nels and Tyra have no choice but to abscond from the castle, charting a hidden world of tangled magic and forlorn phantoms. They must seek out an ancient needle with the power to mend what has been torn, and they have to move fast. Because soon Nels will disappear forever.

Initially I left it off my 2015 future purchases, but it caught my eyes. So here’s hoping things go well.

February 24, 2015

Review: Cinder

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles, book 1) by Merissa Meyers

cinder

Genre: Young Adult Sci/Fi  (AKA Dystopian)
Edition Reviewed: eBook
Amazon: Paperback | Kindle
Goodreads: Cinder (1)

Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth’s fate hinges on one girl.

Cinder, a gifted mechanic, is a cyborg. She’s a second-class citizen with a mysterious past, reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister’s illness. But when her life becomes intertwined with the handsome Prince Kai’s, she suddenly finds herself at the center of an intergalactic struggle, and a forbidden attraction. Caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal, she must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect her world’s future.


Review:

The idea of a Sci-Fi Cinderella tale enchanted me from the get go. The reviews came pouring in and everyone loved it! More importantly the Goodreads friends reviews’ I trust praised the book. Then the series kept getting more and more love as each new title released. It was more a poor choice to not purchase the series, that led me to keep putting it off. (That and my fuddy reading year.) So after the first few sentences I was in love.

There's enough twists and flavors of Cinderella to appease my fairytale remake-loving-soul, while having plenty of originality. You know this really doesn't feel like a “dystopian” this is a futuristic sci-fi. And I'm thankful for that. There's been two more World Wars, people live on the moon called Lunars, humans on earth are facing a mysterious plague with no cure that has devastated the population, and the aforementioned Lunars may attack the earth because of they're evil queen. What I love the most is that on top of all that is tons of political intrigue! Not to mention the mystery of the lost/dead heir of the moon, THE Queen Levana may actually have a cure only if her terms are met, the threat of world domination, and such!

Prince Kai is a heartthrob (even reminds me of the Disney Cinderella's warm personality) and Meyer tries to genuinely build emotions up and make them fall in love. Linh Cinder (AKA Cinderella, best re-name ever!) happens to be a cyborg! Come on the cover tipped you off. Cinder also happens to have a fun side kick Iko, which is probably the best robot in sci-fi ever! Sadly robots and cyborgs are not considered people and it adds a very gritty feel to the world. The story takes place in New Beijing and I love the Asian influences to the story. Every new aspect of the book had me frantically turning the pages for more! More-more-more!

That being said there were some huge gaps in the world building. The smallest gripe is that there is never a true description of the characters. A few hair colors are tossed out, but nothing. Though some of the Lunar guards did get pretty good descriptions and another girl who I think will pop up later. To me I want a complete image of the characters in my mind: how they look, personality, emotions, and all the real stuff. So it left me continuously thinking that both Kai and Cinder were Asian. At one point Cinder does hint that all the nationalities are one, lands have mixed and mingled. Which is awesome. There are hints of kimonos, chopsticks, and stuff. But then there are ball gowns . . . and other stuff. The concept that the home nation still has influences over a mixed society and they've all blended together is—not actually established. My mind kept trying to fill in the blanks.

Also! How did, and when, was the moon made livable. Are the people definitely from earth but because they live on the moon they evolved into “magical” beings. Also, if Cinder can blend into other “countries” if she were to leave new Beijing is the rest of the world just a blend of nationalities. What were the other two World Wars about? Again basic world building stuff. I need more. I want the world to be so well developed that I can completely believe it.

My last issues are about the treatment of Cyborgs. There's a lottery going on that “randomly” picks Cyborgs to be tested for a cure for the plague, because they're not really people. They're property and other people can actually own them. At one point it's even revealed that a worker had to get some cyborg parts after an accident. Which led me to wonder about Vets who might have to have cyborg parts after injuries. Yes, the world has been at peace for well over 100 years. But there are soldiers and “peace times” do not guarantee no conflicts. So does that mean the people who are protecting citizens become loathly creates in the eyes of the very people they're protecting? Even more is that Cinder is cyborg and some scary, down right chilling, things happen to her because of it. Then after a little time and shorter conversation it's all swept under the rug. Even after the big reveal brings to light that the cyborg girls that seemed to keep getting picked in the lottery where indeed not “randomly” being picked. It also bothered me that at no moment was human rights/civil rights or any struggles that humanity has made in the past for equality was never discussed or brought up. No factions that want to help the minority.

That's the problem. Cinder has some amazing ideas here. Meyer is stepping up the game with world wide (and moon) politics and grander story telling outside of the basic fairytale. The follow through should have been solid. Now that I know that the next book also continues Cinder's tale I feel even more about the world and Cinder's story being more developed. More details should have been added to Cinder. Maybe I'm just spoiled, and I'm sure a lot of readers are going to say I'm picky. But when you present something this good I want it to go all the way!

Those frustrations aside, I can't deny that I do love the world Meyer has created—world building holes and all. The characters are all compelling, which is why I want to be able to picture them!! No I mean it. Cinder left me frantic to find out what would happen next, how much would follow the classic tale and the threat of none fairy tale like events. Cinder pulls off some dark elements and I really appreciate it. So far my favorite retellings have always had some grit and not always happy things to reimagine a new kind of magic. It will be said any talk of magic in Cinder is actually science. This is a sci-fi book and I like that even while the Lunars may seem to have magic like powers it's still based in science. In the end Cinder is one of the best genre fusions and reimagining of a fairy tale . . . in quite a while. In the end this quote here should tempt you:

“She was a cyborg, and she would never go to the ball.”

Words I've always dreamed of seeing strung together in one sentence.

Sexual Content: There is some mild fantasies and mild sexual humor in general.

 
3/5- Adored it, just a few minor details held it back.


Previous book(s) in series:
Reviewed on BW: Amazon: Goodreads:
Glitches (0.5)
The Little Android (0.6)
Cinder (1)
The Queen’s Army (1.5)
Scarlet (2)
Cress (3)
Fairest (3.5)
The Princes and the Guard (3.6)
Winter (4)
Glitches (0.5)
The Little Android (0.6)
Cinder (1)
The Queen’s Army (1.5)
Scarlet (2)
Cress (3)
Fairest (3.5)
The Princes and the Guard (3.6)
Winter (4)
Glitches (0.5)
The Little Android (0.6)
Cinder (1)
The Queen’s Army (1.5)
Scarlet (2)
Cress (3)
Fairest (3.5)
The Princes and the Guard (3.6)
Winter (4)
 

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